Newport Restoration Foundation Historic Houses

I picked up my November issue of This Old House magazine and was happy to see a story on the Newport Restoration Foundation houses in Newport, Rhode Island.  The Newport Restoration Foundation was started by Doris Duke in 1968 as a foundation to preserve and protect 83 historic homes in and around Newport.  Today, they have a tenant stewardship program which rents the homes to people who will look after them with care and love, protecting the historical integrity.  My in-laws actually rent one of these homes on Prescott Farm outside of downtown Newport so I was very excited to read the article.  Prescott Farm (where they currently live) is meant to showcase what the rural landscape on Aquidneck Island would have looked like in the 18th and 19th centuries.  On the property is a windmill and a few impressive gardens that are run by master gardeners in partnership with the University of Rhode Island.  

The article in TOH focuses on 3 siblings that each rent one of the homes.  Very cool!  Below are some of the photos from the article that showcase the beauty and historical charm of the homes. Enjoy!

This is the Dayton James house, built in 1758.  It's painted a colonial red with the siding, trim and casings the same color, typical of that era.  Doris Duke chose the colors of all the homes herself.

This is the Dayton James house, built in 1758.  It's painted a colonial red with the siding, trim and casings the same color, typical of that era.  Doris Duke chose the colors of all the homes herself.

The master bedroom inside the Dayton James house has white plaster walls, exposed beams on the ceiling that were refinished (they had been whitewashed) and trim painted in a light green, also typical of the era. My in-laws also have white walls with various color trim throughout their home which I did not realize was so purposeful until now.

The master bedroom inside the Dayton James house has white plaster walls, exposed beams on the ceiling that were refinished (they had been whitewashed) and trim painted in a light green, also typical of the era. My in-laws also have white walls with various color trim throughout their home which I did not realize was so purposeful until now.

The Thomas Townsend House painted in a bright colonial blue circa 1735.

The Thomas Townsend House painted in a bright colonial blue circa 1735.

The Solomon Townsend home circa 1728.  Again classic colors here with the colonial blue and red door.

The Solomon Townsend home circa 1728.  Again classic colors here with the colonial blue and red door.

One of the 5 fireplaces in the Solomon Townsend house.

One of the 5 fireplaces in the Solomon Townsend house.

I love that a family lives in the Solomon Townsend home.  How cool to grow up here?

I love that a family lives in the Solomon Townsend home.  How cool to grow up here?

 

You can see all the houses here at the Restoration Foundation's website.

Images via This Old House